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  1. #16  
    Hardcore Skiboarder g.dub's Avatar
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    A lot of my general foot pain became alleviated when I switched to softboots, before that my method of dealing with the issues that were cropping up was to ride with my hard boots loosened a bit, mostly the top clips... it helped, unless there is heaps of powder, switch to the revolts...und bend sie knees!

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  2. #17  
    Hardcore Skiboarder alnewt1234's Avatar
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    This may not be your problem but something that I had to focus on was my breathing last year. The combination of not controlling/holding my breath and high altitude was causing me to tire out and get cramps more easily. Maybe something to pay attention to next time your out


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  3. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by alnewt1234 View Post
    This may not be your problem but something that I had to focus on was my breathing last year. The combination of not controlling/holding my breath and high altitude was causing me to tire out and get cramps more easily. Maybe something to pay attention to next time your out


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    Hadn't considered that, thanks! I was up to 6,000 feet yesterday and I could definitely feel it!

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  4. #19 Quad burn - Making me want to quit skiboarding 
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atothej81 View Post
    Great, any tips?

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    For me it was about going from a defensive style of skiing that creates a lot of sideways motion and skidding, to getting my skis and my body pointed more downhill. All that braking puts a lot of strain on your boots and your legs. Apart from technique, it can also be tactical, by choosing a line down the hill that allows the terrain to control your speed rather than the edges of your skiboards.

    I'm still not there yet, but I'm getting there, and can really feel the difference in my legs.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  5. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
    For me it was about going from a defensive style of skiing that creates a lot of sideways motion and skidding, to getting my skis and my body pointed more downhill. All that braking puts a lot of strain on your boots and your legs. Apart from technique, it can also be tactical, by choosing a line down the hill that allows the terrain to control your speed rather than the edges of your skiboards.
    Thanks for pointing this out. I think for me, this is precisely my problem. I'll have to try to work on that this year somehow.
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  6. #21  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atothej81 View Post
    ....All last season and on my first trip this season, I've experienced soooo much quad burn and calf aches. I'm trying to stay upright and not "in the backseat," but nothing is helping. I'm riding the 110cm Rockered Condors with the Riser system. I also have some Revolt Trees 105cm.

    Not sure what I'm doing wrong, but it's ruining my enjoyment of the sport, and making me want to try snowboarding or go back to skiing.....!
    I didn't see it answered in this thread but how long have you been skiboarding and, prior to that, how long were you on long skis. While on long skis did you ever experience any of this?

    Here's why I ask, while I think all the posters above may be pointing to things you can consider when trying to correct this I'd offer something different (but similar to Bad Wolf) that is outside of correcting your stance or doing wall sits. I had a very similar problem when I started skiboarding and found that it was caused by riding very cautiously and constantly braking and checking my speed. This would cause horrible quad and calf pain because I was using my muscles to constantly panic brake. As I became more confident on skiboards and learned to use turn shape to control speed the burn went away. Also repetition built up my muscles so there was less burn and fatigue. I came to this conclusion after the quad burn returned unexpectedly one day. This just happened to be a day I was teaching a friend and spent the entire day checking my speed. When I went out the next day without him and skied normally the burn disappeared.

    So my advice would be to stick with it and as your confidence and technique on skiboards improve the burn will go away.

    One sidenote: If have access to a hot tub or pool after your ski day jump in and work the stiffness out of your muscles. This is my one must do at the end of each day of a long ski trip so I can stack multiple days in a row without waking up and starting with leg pain.
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  7. #22  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bluewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie View Post
    I had a very similar problem when I started skiboarding and found that it was caused by riding very cautiously and constantly braking and checking my speed. This would cause horrible quad and calf pain because I was using my muscles to constantly panic brake. As I became more confident on skiboards and learned to use turn shape to control speed the burn went away. Also repetition built up my muscles so there was less burn and fatigue. I came to this conclusion after the quad burn returned unexpectedly one day. This just happened to be a day I was teaching a friend and spent the entire day checking my speed. When I went out the next day without him and skied normally the burn disappeared.

    So my advice would be to stick with it and as your confidence and technique on skiboards improve the burn will go away.
    Wookie - great point. Now that I think of it I too experience leg fatigue when I first started riding for the same reason - always checking my speed and breaking. For me, I also was riding in a very rigid stance basically ready for something to go wrong at any second and prepared to react to it. Since I was on Head 94s which are short, stiff and had basically zero flex I also found I was also pulling up with my toes inside my boot to try and keep the tips up. Once I relaxed, rode a bit faster and stopped worrying about face planting, the leg fatigue was relieved.
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  8. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluewing View Post
    Wookie - great point. Now that I think of it I too experience leg fatigue when I first started riding for the same reason - always checking my speed and breaking. For me, I also was riding in a very rigid stance basically ready for something to go wrong at any second and prepared to react to it. Since I was on Head 94s which are short, stiff and had basically zero flex I also found I was also pulling up with my toes inside my boot to try and keep the tips up. Once I relaxed, rode a bit faster and stopped worrying about face planting, the leg fatigue was relieved.
    I definitely notice I've been riding scared but when you're AJ east coaster experiencing whistler for the first time, you're bound to be apprehensive!

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  9. #24  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atothej81 View Post
    ..... when you're AJ east coaster experiencing whistler for the first time, you're bound to be apprehensive! .....
    Whoa! Go easy on the limitations of East Coasters. Your mindset is all wrong. East Coasters are the gods of the ski world and don't let anyone tell you differently. Born from ice, crud, slush, and all other crappy and variable conditions we learn to ski on terrain that would make those pampered West Coast and Rocky Mountain skiers cry. You are a grizzled winter combat veteran that can turn an icy disaster into a glorious day on the slopes. Wear your East Coast heritage with pride and remember when all those other soft skiers were enjoying their safe and easy armpit deep powder you were earning your turns on a mountain that was trying to kill you.

    This post was brought to you by the fine shred heads at SKI THE EAST

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  10. #25  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bluewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atothej81 View Post
    I definitely notice I've been riding scared but when you're AJ east coaster experiencing whistler for the first time, you're bound to be apprehensive!
    I can relate to that being an East Coast skier myself. When I was in Steamboat last February for the first time, I was skiing with a guide in large group for 3 days, which was great. Being with a guide who was my age range (50+) that has skied Steamboat for a minimum of 15+ years made me feel mostly at ease on unfamiliar terrain. However, the length of the runs and the continuous vertical did present a few periods of apprehension. Where I ski in the Northeast most runs are not that long and even if they are the steepest part of the vertical is relatively short in comparison to some of the runs I was on at Steamboat. Same was true when I was at Kirkwood, Copper Mountain, etc. The fact that I had to be attentive for much longer periods of time on the runs was a bit mentally tiring - on top of the additional physical work - until I mentally adjusted and relaxed my mind and body. One thing to be aware of: your mind and its thoughts translate into physiological reactions. If your mind is tense, then your body is tense. If you mind is in a panic, then your body panics.

    One thing that was very helpful in Steamboat is that the guide broke every run up into a few sections. We would get a quick briefing on a given run and the guide would point out a landmark at which we were to ski and regroup. That was great because it gave my mind and body a brief break before continuing on the run. Might be worthwhile trying that even if you are riding alone. Pick out a landmark to ski to and stop safely. Relax, enjoy the view, plan the next segment and move on.
    In pursuit of Peace, Harmony and Flow.....
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    Boards ridden, some owned: Sherpas, Spruce 120 "STS", Blunts, DS110 custom prototypes, Rockered Condors, Revolts, DLPs, Summit Custom 110s, Summit Marauders, Head 94s, Raptor prototypes, Osprey prototypes.
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  11. #26  
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    +1 on boots making a big difference.

    I've been skiboarding for 4 years or so at just a week per season, coming from intermediate skier, staying on blue slopes mostly adding some reds from time to time. Had my own boots, in good shape, but bought about some 10+ years ago.

    No matter what boards I was using, after a couple of runs I couldn't maintain proper posture any longer, I was using muscles, knees, back to compensate, so I had to take a break to rest on almost every slope. And been quite beat up after a couple of hours.

    Last winter I went with some friends for a weekend of skiing and things went like described above.

    Getting back I decided to buy new boots. Went back to the mountains a few weeks later.

    Suddenly maintaining a proper posture was a piece of cake, letting gravity do the hard work was painless, the Revolts could tackle any slope, and suddenly I was doing any red and even blacks with no more rest breaks and no more pain.

    Same person, no extra training or anything, just different boots and everything changed ...

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  12. #27  
    Skiboarder snowjam's Avatar
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    I'm a bit late to the party and I apologize for dodging your equipment question...

    But I also want to highly recommend strength training, particularly with barbells. If you've got any interest in general fitness beyond skiboarding, you'll find it extraordinarily beneficial in all aspects of life.

    I've been strength training for going on four years now, with squats and deadlifts as well as a mix of bodyweight/barbells for upper body. The overall strength I've developed has nearly eliminated what used to be days of miserable soreness after hitting the slopes, especially in the early season.

    You don't have to be super dedicated or aggressive either, I'm still 5'11 hovering around 145lbs., by no means a hulking gym nut. But it has made a world of difference, and the training process is a ton of fun!

    I recommend checking out Starting Strength as well as Reddit's bodyweightfitness community for some great resources!
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