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  1. #1 New tall skiboarder advice 
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    Hi all! I'm excited to get started!

    I've been culling through the new skiboarder section and thought I would ask.

    I'm a tall guy - 6' 7" / 220 lbs - Age: 42.
    Skier for 10 years - upper intermediate. Snowboarding for 2 seasons - lower intermediate.
    I have also been playing hockey for 15 years.

    I've tried skiboarding once before and loved it and am looking to make a transition completely. I want soft boot/snowboard bindings.

    When I've skied, I've typically riden shorter skis than my height dictates. (160cm) I liked the maneuverability. I prefer groomers or all-mountain. Just want to cruise. don't totally care about terrain park.

    Based on my research, my height dictates over 100cm skiboards, but I don't want it to feel like I'm just riding my skis all over again.

    Looking for recommendations on skiboards based on above and looking at SBOL demo program.

    Thanks!
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  2. #2  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    If you are looking for a short groomer board try the RVL8 Sticky Icky Ickies or the Revolts. I am 43 - 6'4" - 210lbs and enjoy both boards. The Stickies are the new popular boards this season. They are ideal for skaters that want a skate-like feel in their boards with a wide performance envelope. Neither the Stickies or the Revolts will "feel like skis".

    As a taller rider you could go a lot longer and still maintain that nimble feel but if you already have skis and a snowboard start with a 100-105cm skiboard for that completely different minimalism feel.

    I can't comment on riding in soft boots other than to say as a hockey player I did not like them the few times I tried them. The soft boots were ... well ... too soft. Compared to hockey skates its a bit of a sloppy connection best suited IMHO to riding in softer, deep snow not the hardpack conditions that I typically get.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  3. #3  
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    As another tall rider myself at 6'4" and 200lb before gear, I feel that length and width are a continuum, it's not a simple short vs. long choice. As you go up from say 88cm to 180cm length, things gradually change. On some days I like being on the long end of the scale, on others on the short. Generally, you will want to go wider as you go shorter for the same conditions. If you are more carving and speed oriented, longer and stiffer would be better. For easy cruising you want some early rise or some rocker, but not fully rockered or too much, and softer boards, like the Spruce 120s. Too short or too stiff or too cambered, and your easy cruising will turn into "need attention too often" type of riding. Too long, too wide, or too stiff/cambered, and it needs too much input to do what you want.

    Shorter lengths are a bumpier ride, less stable in every way I can think of, less cornering capability, more maneuverable, more tiring overall.

    For bigger (heavier) folks like us we need wider or longer boards sooner when it gets softer than petite 100lb females or youngsters. For groomers I feel wider than about 11cm is too wide almost any time, and narrower is better if you have enough length to provide enough surface area to support you. This season I am on 79mm wide carving skis in "only" 156cm length (170 or 176cm is recommended for me in this model). They have more grip and ride better than my wider but shorter skiboards, except you can't pivot them as quickly as a 100cm board. Going to the same 79mm width on a 131cm ski is a lot of fun, until the conditions get soft - then they lack support and tend to become grabby as they ride too deep.

    Very short 88cm or less boards, especially if ridden with non-release bindings, are noticeably more lively and turny than a 105cm board with release bindings. Very short boards also have to be ridden differently IMO, more like skates, more dynamically, maybe relying more on one leg being forward for increased fore-aft stability. I also need to ride them with "powder" technique much sooner when the groomers get choppy or soft, i.e., with more even distribution of weight between both boards (as opposed to more weight on the outside ski). Shorter boards, while IMO more challenging in most conditions, allow one to do whatever they want whenever I want (not prep time or planning needed) - pivot, twist, hockey stop, whatever. At a blink of an eye. With longer boards I need increasingly more planning and better technique to get them to do what I want. They are not "harder", in fact, I am less tired after a day on long skis than I am on skiboards, just they are more subdued, slower to react, less jumpy, smoother...

    As for specific board recommendation, I think of all boards I've tried, for groomers and your style of riding, I think the Sticky Icky would be a great choice. I had revolts the year before and they were fine, but the SIIs do better as conditions worsen, and I think they are just a better board in just about every aspect than the Revolt. Not by huge margins in many cases, but significant in some. The Revolt is still good, and if found second hand could be an excellent value. SIIs don't come for sale second hand yet (except one pair in Europe at an outrageous asking price).

    Also worth a look are the short skis at snoblades.com, in particular the Head Ethan Too in 141cm. For groomer cruising I think they beat most if not all skiboards, IMO. Unless you want that distinct very short skiboard feeling at the cost of other factors, a ski like that is perfect for groomers.

    Lastly about soft boots - your choice. I tried them, did not particularly like them overall, but I can see that with the right type of snowboard boots and on wider boards they can be pretty good, especially in softer conditions or if you are not particularly demanding of precise edge control.
    Last edited by Kocho; 03-17-2017 at 12:43 PM. Reason: typos...
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  4. #4  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Why soft boots?

    Of all people I understand the desire for comfort, but I've come to believe that soft boot set ups are best for experienced riders in specific conditions. It does worry me that folks new to the sport don't succeed in soft boots because of a lack of finite control. Then they blame the boards and get frustrated. I would go with ski boots first, then expand into soft boots later if you want to.

    As far a pure performance goes, skiboards are at their best with ski boots and quality non release bindings. YVMD.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  5. #5  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noties View Post
    I'm a tall guy - 6' 7" / 220 lbs - Age: 42.
    Skier for 10 years - upper intermediate. Snowboarding for 2 seasons - lower intermediate.
    I have also been playing hockey for 15 years.

    I've tried skiboarding once before and loved it and am looking to make a transition completely. I want soft boot/snowboard bindings.

    When I've skied, I've typically riden shorter skis than my height dictates. (160cm) I liked the maneuverability. I prefer groomers or all-mountain. Just want to cruise. don't totally care about terrain park.
    Welcome to the tall guy skiboarder's hockey club. What position do you play? Wookie's our goalie and I'm the lumbering defenseman.

    At 6'7" (!) you're probably off the "recommended ski length chart", which many here agree is bogus and should be ignored. I'm with Wookie, Kocho (and others who will undoubtedly chime in) that the new "sticky" would be a great board for you. IMO it's size/performance ratio is unbeatable. Another option worth considering in the regulation skiboard category the Blunt XL, a wider but still nimble ride which might have a slight edge in certain off-groomer conditions over the Sticky. As Kocho mentioned, the Head EthanToo (and I would add the Spruce longboards) have their own good qualities, but you indicated wanting to go with a full-on skiboard.

    Boots are such an individual thing it's hard to make any generalizations. Some prefer super-stiff hard boots and others get along great with soft boots. Some riders go back and forth. Personally, my hard boots are modified for a softer flex and upright stance, while my softboot set-up is made as rigid as possible. For some riders at least, the sweet spot seems to be in the middle.

    edit: I do agree with Bad Wolf that hard boots are a "safer bet", and there's also something to be said for making one change at a time.
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  6. #6  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill View Post
    Welcome to the tall guy skiboarder's hockey club. What position do you play? Wookie's our goalie and I'm the lumbering defenseman......
    I really need to get the iSkiboard hockey jerseys printed up:

    Wookie -- Skiboard Hockey Jersey

    ... and no Bill I will not consider doing these in St Louis Blues colors.

    To stay on topic with the thread and to add to BadWolf's soft boot thoughts. A bad soft boot set-up is a bit like skating without lacing up your skates (to compare it to hockey). With hard boots you get a better lateral connection to your skiboards and can more aggressively control them particularly on hard snow.

    One other thought here is I would guess at 6'7" you likely have big boots and soft boot set-ups can get bulky as the boots get bigger. Before ordering a softboot setup modified for skiboards you might want to check if the XL is big enough for your boots otherwise, if you already have a rigid hi-back binding for your snowboard you might be best off just adding the wings, third strap, and risers from this SBOL kit: http://www.skiboardsonline.com/p/rvl8softbootkit.html

    If you end up with questions regarding fitting bigger boots in any binding Kocho is the guy to connect with here on the forum. He has some monster feet (I mean that as a complement) and has tried or researched most binding types and how they would fit with his boots.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  7. #7  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie View Post
    ... and no Bill I will not consider doing these in St Louis Blues colors.
    That's okay. It was very thoughtful of you to do up those jerseys in Allis-Chalmers orange...
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  8. #8  
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    Thanks for the advice. This is just what I was looking for.

    You're right - I was looking for comfort when I said soft boot. I may take your advice on starting with ski boots. It might be time to buy some new good ski boots. Mine are old and I can't stand wearing them. Every time I snowboard, I wonder why I put myself through it. Maybe a nice new pair will be the ticket.

    Appreciate the advice on the length of skis and feel. Really looking forward to getting out and demo'ing. Hoping this season - California's had the best season in ages.



    HOCKEY: I play defense.
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  9. #9  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noties View Post
    You're right - I was looking for comfort when I said soft boot. I may take your advice on starting with ski boots. It might be time to buy some new good ski boots. Mine are old and I can't stand wearing them. Every time I snowboard, I wonder why I put myself through it. Maybe a nice new pair will be the ticket.
    After trying and failing with traditional boot fitting, what eventually worked for me was buying off the shelf entry level boots aimed at comfort rather than peak performance. When skiboarding, we tend to have a more relaxed and upright stance than skiers, so "good" or advanced ski boots don't really suit our style anyway. Entry level boots tend to be wider, more upright and softer flexing, which makes them not only functional, but comfortable for skiboarders. I would also avoid the common advice on size, which advocates your toes touching the front of the boot when standing. The theory here is that your toes will pull back when you adopt a forward lean. Again, we tend to be more centered on skiboards, so why spend the day with your toes crushed? With my shoe size, ski boot fitters want me in a 26.5 mondo ski boot, which feels very cramped. I went up a size to 27.5 mondo and am happy with my boots for the first time.

    I know a lot of what I am saying goes against common ski boot advice, but it worked for me, so take it with a grain of salt.

    The best part about entry level boots is the cost. I paid $109 for my Head Cubes through Level 9 Sports. All the boot manufacturers have ski boots aimed at the entry level to intermediate skier. I like the Heads, but many on the forum find the Atomic Live Fit series very comfortable as well.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  10. #10  
    Hardcore Skiboarder valmorel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
    After trying and failing with traditional boot fitting, what eventually worked for me was buying off the shelf entry level boots aimed at comfort rather than peak performance. When skiboarding, we tend to have a more relaxed and upright stance than skiers, so "good" or advanced ski boots don't really suit our style anyway. Entry level boots tend to be wider, more upright and softer flexing, which makes them not only functional, but comfortable for skiboarders. I would also avoid the common advice on size, which advocates your toes touching the front of the boot when standing. The theory here is that your toes will pull back when you adopt a forward lean. Again, we tend to be more centered on skiboards, so why spend the day with your toes crushed? With my shoe size, ski boot fitters want me in a 26.5 mondo ski boot, which feels very cramped. I went up a size to 27.5 mondo and am happy with my boots for the first time.

    I know a lot of what I am saying goes against common ski boot advice, but it worked for me, so take it with a grain of salt.

    The best part about entry level boots is the cost. I paid $109 for my Head Cubes through Level 9 Sports. All the boot manufacturers have ski boots aimed at the entry level to intermediate skier. I like the Heads, but many on the forum find the Atomic Live Fit series very comfortable as well.
    Agreed. My ski boots are too big for me if one listens to the "experts". In the real world they are great.

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  11. #11 New tall skiboarder advice 
    Hardcore Skiboarder macrophotog's Avatar
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    Another hockey defenseman here

    I have not ridden the Sticky Icky's yet, but these are well liked and already recommended by several other tall guys - so that is a great option.

    I'm a fan of the wider BluntXL's for all conditions, and the Rockered Condors too, but most people only use the RC in powder for which it was designed.

    I whole heartily agree with Kocho and Bill's suggestion of the Ethan Too's. At 141cm they aren't skiboards, but they sure perform like them for me. I'm only 6'0" but it was funny the other day when a Liftie asked me 'so are those technically blades?' I laughed and said no, just short skis. Anyway, I have triple the time on my Ethan Toos this year than all my other skiboards/skis combined - they are that great.


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    Boards / Skis
    RVL8 - Blunt XL 100
    Spruce - Crossbow 115
    Head - Ethan Too 141 & 151, SuperShape i.Titan 156
    Armada - Triple J 155
    Faction - Candide 2.0 166
    (previous: RVL8 - Revolt, KTP, DLP, Blunt, Rockered Condor, and BWP. Spruce - 120 and Osprey. Head Salamander 94, Caddy 131 & 151, and Ethan Too 161. Atomic - 1:20, Access 151, and Punx III 140. Summit Invertigo, Hagan OffLimit)
    Bindings
    Tyrolia PRD 12, Spruce Pro Risers w/ Tyrolia Attack 13
    Boots
    Atomic Overload Reactor 100
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  12. #12  
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    Thanks all for the advice and tips. I'm looking through the replies and see a couple of options.

    Some of you have recommended the Sticky Ickys - - let's say I potentially tried and liked them and wanted to acquire some. It appears that they're all sold out on SBOL. Am I relegated to watching the sell forums or ebay for someone selling?
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  13. #13  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noties View Post
    Thanks all for the advice and tips. I'm looking through the replies and see a couple of options.

    Some of you have recommended the Sticky Ickys - - let's say I potentially tried and liked them and wanted to acquire some. It appears that they're all sold out on SBOL. Am I relegated to watching the sell forums or ebay for someone selling?
    I would surprised to see any used Ickys show up for resale. This is the first year they were made and they proved to be very popular. Maybe someone out there bought a pair and just didn't get along with them. I guess the lack of availability, either new or used, is a testament to their popularity.

    You could also check with Greco and see if there are plans for another production run planned, although it does seem a little late in the season now.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  14. #14  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Definitely check with Greco. While there are no new Stickies for sale he may have a returned demo set that he could sell you.

    Also post a WTB (want to buy) post on the buy/sell subforum. That may encourage someone that was not happy with them to sell them before the season is over.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  15. #15  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bill's Avatar
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    If the Stickies are sure enough unavailable, the Blunt XL is a heck of a skiboard. They're big fun. As others have commented---if you're open to short skis---the Ethan Toos are excellent and a great value.

    Unfortunately, we're short on forwards with a goalie (Wookie) and three defensemen (noties, Macro, and myself) on the roster. Macro strikes me as a versatile sort, maybe he can move up and play wing ala Dustin Byfuglien. Kocho, don't you play? If so, what position? Anyone else?
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