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  1. #1 Equipment selection 
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    Edit: i just realised i think this might be in the wrong section. Please go ahead and move it if it is.

    I'm new here, been snowboarding for about 8 years but the past couple years didn't get out much. I've been reading here and think I want to give skiboards a go and get back on the mountains. I'm wondering what a good beginner set would be? I've read the chart in the other thread. I'm 5'11" and about 220 lbs. Leaves me with a few choices. The condors, ALP and KTP are I think the ones that fit me most. Will be doing all mountain, little bit of everything. I read the description of the skiboards ive stated and says not recommended for beginers.. just looking for opinions. Should i ignore there beginner statement?
    What width boatds should i be looking for? Wide? Medium?
    What are the pros and cons of the width differences? I know wide is better for powder but thats about all my knowledge. Thanks.
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    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    The short length of skiboards makes them all fun to ride, but there are some differences to consider. The "all mountain board" that is also good in all conditions doesn't really exist, so I think it s best to buy the board that will suit the conditions you will encounter the most. Having said all that, the most versatile board I have ever ridden are the Ickys. Since I got them last year they have effectively replaced most of the other boards I owned. So they are a great recommendation based on what you have told us so far.

    Will you be in soft or hard boots, what kind of bindings do you intend to use and will you be in the park?
    Just these, nothing else !

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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post

    Will you be in soft or hard boots, what kind of bindings do you intend to use and will you be in the park?

    I was thinking about getting the rvl8 non release bindings and hard boots just because I figured it would be best. But I do already have snowboard bindings and boots but I would think they wouldn't preform as well. I'm not too worried about spending the extra money, I just want a good experience. And I wouldn't be hitting long fresh powder runs Mayne just cutting through some trees from one trail to the other. Will mostly be groomed trails and maybe up to 6 inch of power in an average day. If I know there is a huge snowfall I can just grab my snowboard for the day. Or buy another set of skiboard s in the future for powder. I won't be going crazy in the park. That I know of lol maybe some jumps and spins when im more comfortable. I have never skied before. I'm a bit of a bigger guy with a bad back from time to time.
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  4. #4  
    Hardcore Skiboarder g.dub's Avatar
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    Hey Grmpy, I think your instinct might be on the right track. Skiboards were traditionally a non-release deal, while perceived risk is increased (thus a release option) so is control (ooo yea). Softboot configuration comes with a bit more required assembly chiefly a stiffer boot than what you have, the conversation kit and an understanding of risers. Many of us started on sub 100 cm boards which are less common these days. At your size I would recommend the DLP (110 cm) or Spliff (109 cm) for all mountain variable condition riding, but you couldn't go wrong with the Revolt (105 cm) Sticky Icky Icky (104 cm) or KTP (101 cm). Width is the blunt force way of dealing with powder while rocker is the more subtle way. All of these boards will perform in the conditions you described. Just my opinion but I hope it helps a bit!
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by g.dub View Post
    Hey Grmpy, I think your instinct might be on the right track. Skiboards were traditionally a non-release deal, while perceived risk is increased (thus a release option) so is control (ooo yea). Softboot configuration comes with a bit more required assembly chiefly a stiffer boot than what you have, the conversation kit and an understanding of risers. Many of us started on sub 100 cm boards which are less common these days. At your size I would recommend the DLP (110 cm) or Spliff (109 cm) for all mountain variable condition riding, but you couldn't go wrong with the Revolt (105 cm) Sticky Icky Icky (104 cm) or KTP (101 cm). Width is the blunt force way of dealing with powder while rocker is the more subtle way. All of these boards will perform in the conditions you described. Just my opinion but I hope it helps a bit!
    That's for the reply the DLP is one I was leaning on a little more from it's slight size increase and width from the stickys.

    The spiffs are quite a bit larger, would it be a little more difficult to learn on? I'm kinda leaning on the DLP for the middle ground for now but if I love them I'd probably buy another set for powder days.

    Another quick question, are the 10mm risers needed or does it all depend on the boots? Wondering if I should order them at the same time.
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  6. #6  
    TeamRVL8 | DLP Davelynam's Avatar
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    I've taught plenty of people on the DLPs.

    No risers are needed for hard boot setups.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davelynam View Post
    I've taught plenty of people on the DLPs.

    No risers are needed for hard boot setups.
    Thanks!
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  8. #8  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grmpy View Post
    That's for the reply the DLP is one I was leaning on a little more from it's slight size increase and width from the stickys.
    Since you are looking for a board to primarily ride groomers you cannot go wrong with the DLPs. They are a solid design that has been around for a while and are loved by both their namesake (Dave Lynam) and others that ride them. With the stickies you might get a easier turning board that can better handle light powder, due to the rocker, but you are trading off a little fore/aft stability with the shorter length.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grmpy View Post
    The spiffs are quite a bit larger, would it be a little more difficult to learn on? I'm kinda leaning on the DLP for the middle ground for now but if I love them I'd probably buy another set for powder days.
    I would not recommend the Spliffs to someone new to the sport. They are a great board but their width is a little tough to start on and they really perform best when you ride them with a purpose. As you are just transitioning from Snowboarding to Skiboards you'll likely not be to aggressive. If you start your quiver with the DLPs and then want something powder specific consider either a pair of RVL8 Rockered Condors or Spruce Sherpas or Ospreys for a guy your size. The Spiffs would be the compromise to move to if you wanted a "jack of all trades" board but it wont float your size as well as those other boards.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grmpy View Post
    Another quick question, are the 10mm risers needed or does it all depend on the boots? Wondering if I should order them at the same time.
    Dave's comment above is right. The Risers aren't needed. These are intended for Softboot set-ups.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2017 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  9. #9  
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    Thanks wookie, and everyone else. I have been doing quite a bit of reading along with these opinions and I think I'm going to go for the DLPs with some gold receptor bindings.

    I appreciate everyone's help, my last question will be regarding boots. I know everyone is different so I will be buying or ordering these local to get a good fit, and I've never had hard boots so I will let a pro fit me. But do you guys have any suggestions or advise? Like flex ratings or even a specific boot to try? I would like to keep the price reasonable let's say around or under 300USD (I'm in Canada so that's probably like 400 here lol). Again, thanks everyone, I'm getting pretty stoked to get the ball rolling.
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  10. #10  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grmpy View Post
    Thanks wookie, and everyone else. I have been doing quite a bit of reading along with these opinions and I think I'm going to go for the DLPs with some gold receptor bindings.

    I appreciate everyone's help, my last question will be regarding boots. I know everyone is different so I will be buying or ordering these local to get a good fit, and I've never had hard boots so I will let a pro fit me. But do you guys have any suggestions or advise? Like flex ratings or even a specific boot to try? I would like to keep the price reasonable let's say around or under 300USD (I'm in Canada so that's probably like 400 here lol). Again, thanks everyone, I'm getting pretty stoked to get the ball rolling.
    You can select ski boots with a relatively soft flex and still get great performance from your skiboards. You don't need a ultra stiff boot just one that fits really well and is comfortable for you. Most riders prefer a boot with a more upright stance as skiboarding works with a more natural standing body position as opposed to the forward leaning ski racer stance. Some boots have an adjustment for this but if you look for boots that are targeted toward park skiers and freeskiers you'll likely find a stance and flex that works best for you. As for your price range you should be fine especially if you are not hung up on having the latest model and a load of gadgets. When working with a boot fitter tell them your budget (or maybe a limit just under your budget). A good boot fitter should be able to not only find something that fits your foot but also your wallet. My wife and two daughters all have boots that they love that cost less the 200 USD.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2017 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  11. #11  
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    I have a lot of boards. When I can only take one pair, I choose Sticky's'. When I can take two pairs, I choose Blunt XL and DLP's. Most of the skiboard options recommended here and in other threads are all going to be easy to learn on including DLP's. But you should know that DLP's are stiff boards that really excel for me at high speed on groomers and in the park. They like to be pushed. I loan out Sticky's (and Slapdashes before I got Stickys) to first time riders because they are forgiving and versatile.

    As for boots I've found that to be a very personal choice - the fit, the control and the comfort level. Two people riding the same boards will prefer different boots. You may be better off renting some demo boots a few times before settling on what you want to commit to. This is particularly true if your feet are sensitive. A good boot fitter is highly, highly recommended.
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  12. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie View Post
    You can select ski boots with a relatively soft flex and still get great performance from your skiboards. You don't need a ultra stiff boot just one that fits really well and is comfortable for you. Most riders prefer a boot with a more upright stance as skiboarding works with a more natural standing body position as opposed to the forward leaning ski racer stance. Some boots have an adjustment for this but if you look for boots that are targeted toward park skiers and freeskiers you'll likely find a stance and flex that works best for you. As for your price range you should be fine especially if you are not hung up on having the latest model and a load of gadgets. When working with a boot fitter tell them your budget (or maybe a limit just under your budget). A good boot fitter should be able to not only find something that fits your foot but also your wallet. My wife and two daughters all have boots that they love that cost less the 200 USD.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fun Machine View Post
    I have a lot of boards. When I can only take one pair, I choose Sticky's'. When I can take two pairs, I choose Blunt XL and DLP's. Most of the skiboard options recommended here and in other threads are all going to be easy to learn on including DLP's. But you should know that DLP's are stiff boards that really excel for me at high speed on groomers and in the park. They like to be pushed. I loan out Sticky's (and Slapdashes before I got Stickys) to first time riders because they are forgiving and versatile.

    As for boots I've found that to be a very personal choice - the fit, the control and the comfort level. Two people riding the same boards will prefer different boots. You may be better off renting some demo boots a few times before settling on what you want to commit to. This is particularly true if your feet are sensitive. A good boot fitter is highly, highly recommended.

    Thanks again guys. I have ordered the DLPs and receptor bindings! I'm going to visit a couple local ski shops to find boots, appreciate all the help!
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  13. #13  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grmpy View Post
    .... I'm going to visit a couple local ski shops to find boots, appreciate all the help!
    With skiboots ... If they are uncomfortable in the shop they wont get better on the hill. There is some break in in ski boots but it's better to buy a boot that does not have any "hot spots" than hope they go away as the liner packs out.

    GOOD LUCK
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2017 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  14. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie View Post
    With skiboots ... If they are uncomfortable in the shop they wont get better on the hill. There is some break in in ski boots but it's better to buy a boot that does not have any "hot spots" than hope they go away as the liner packs out.

    GOOD LUCK
    Thanks. The guy I was dealing with was very helpful, took about an hour and a half, 5 pairs and I ended up buying some Nordica NRGY pro 2. Even gave me 135 bucks off
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  15. #15  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Cool. Welcome to Skiboarding!
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2017 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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