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  1. #16  
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    One thing I've been wondering is how binding position affects flex and stress on the boards. I've noticed that with a foot raised and putting a bit of pressure on the tail of the board (standing still) there's a pretty obvious bend point that occurs right under the rear of the binding. This is where my M6's snapped on me. I'm sure well-made skiboards are meant to take it, but it seems like the bindings must put a tremendous amount of pressure at this point, especially when you land a drop backseat.

    I'm not really set back in terms of binding mounting (using the front set of holes on my Receptors on the centre-only 4 x 4 mount), but I do put my boots almost full back on the bindings.

    More of an observation than a question, but any comments?
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  2. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeps View Post
    One thing I've been wondering is how binding position affects flex and stress on the boards. I've noticed that with a foot raised and putting a bit of pressure on the tail of the board (standing still) there's a pretty obvious bend point that occurs right under the rear of the binding. This is where my M6's snapped on me. I'm sure well-made skiboards are meant to take it, but it seems like the bindings must put a tremendous amount of pressure at this point, especially when you land a drop backseat.

    I'm not really set back in terms of binding mounting (using the front set of holes on my Receptors on the centre-only 4 x 4 mount), but I do put my boots almost full back on the bindings.

    More of an observation than a question, but any comments?
    There definitely seems to be a relationship between the effective footprint of a binding and the flex of a skiboard. The longer the binding, the less it will flex. That may be a positive or negative, depending in your riding style. Some riders do also report the feeling of a “flat spot” when direct fixing their bindings to their boards.

    As far as feel and responsiveness goes, nothing seems to compare to non release binding, but as you have mentioned, it does produce a potential lever to cause aboard to fail under stress. Some riders have even reported flexing their board enough to contact the raised part of a riser.

    Pros and cons.....
    Just these, nothing else !

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  3. #18  
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    I would think that in order to flex your board to the point of failure/breakage you'd have to be riding pretty hard. I know that there are a lot of park people here (which is awesome, but I would kill myself in the park) and I would imagine that is where the most "breakage" would occur.

    For someone who is mainly on regular old fashion groomed runs, or even off the run a bit, unless there is jumping/dropping down faces, the normal flex point or extended flex point shouldn't really be affected right?
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  4. #19  
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    I've chewed up my rubber under-binding pads a bit, mostly at the back I think. They're heavily imprinted with the bottom of the binding.

    I'm no park rat, just big all-mountain stuff. Did a lot of drops this year, mostly in the 5 - 15 ft (vertical) range. Good runs where I had my lines down might have involved as many as 8 consecutive drops. Next year I'll be back at Kicking Horse where it's steeper and I can put more speed back in the mix. The last run of the season up there was pure awesome... drop, scream down a face full of powder, bigger drop, ride it out through more fresh, didn't eat it.

    Honestly, towards the end of the season I was more concerned about snapping my tibia than my tails, after a few too many backseat landings... I'd prefer to break the tails.


    My M7's were 20 years old, so I'm not so much concerned about breaking a Spliff or a DLP any time soon.
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  5. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeps View Post
    I've chewed up my rubber under-binding pads a bit, mostly at the back I think. They're heavily imprinted with the bottom of the binding.

    I'm no park rat, just big all-mountain stuff. Did a lot of drops this year, mostly in the 5 - 15 ft (vertical) range. Good runs where I had my lines down might have involved as many as 8 consecutive drops. Next year I'll be back at Kicking Horse where it's steeper and I can put more speed back in the mix. The last run of the season up there was pure awesome... drop, scream down a face full of powder, bigger drop, ride it out through more fresh, didn't eat it.

    Honestly, towards the end of the season I was more concerned about snapping my tibia than my tails, after a few too many backseat landings... I'd prefer to break the tails.


    My M7's were 20 years old, so I'm not so much concerned about breaking a Spliff or a DLP any time soon.
    I did a lot of drops this year too. They were mostly vertical, straight down, consistently about 5'9... aka me falling on my face. I hope with the upgrade in boards for me that I will progress quickly and get some confidence to get off the groomed runs and do a little exploring.
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  6. #21  
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    I ride pretty much always centered. But I play in the park and ride switch all the time. These modern R8 and Spruce boards are far better built than those M7s. My first Atomic blades broke after a moderate back seat landing off an S box. My skiboards have been subjected to far worse and are fine. The flex is definitely affected when used with Spruce risers both positively and negatively. The riser not only has a longer contact length under the foot to reduce the flex but when the board flexes enough for the tips of the riser to make contact with the board it creates an artificial "step-up" in flex which changes the behavior of the board under pressure. This happens to me all the time and all my boards have marks where they make contact. I'm not worried about the boards breaking at the contact point (try breaking a pop stick in half over an edge, then try breaking a half of one over the same edge, it's harder because you don't have leverage). But I've for example experienced severe chatter and slip-out on fast hard turns on dense hard pack and concluded it's because the flex beyond the point of contact changes the curve of the edge and causes the stiffer center area to lift up and disengage while the tips are still gripping. To compensate I've changed my riding style away from pure carving on skiboards with risers. The DLP are built like tanks. If you end up breaking those from stress, you will probably have other more important things to worry about than the boards. Just ride smart and stay safe!
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  7. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvhoffman View Post
    I did a lot of drops this year too. They were mostly vertical, straight down, consistently about 5'9... aka me falling on my face. I hope with the upgrade in boards for me that I will progress quickly and get some confidence to get off the groomed runs and do a little exploring.
    Don't worry, you'll be up to catching your tips in heavy pow and flying ten feet through the air before you land on your face in no time! I remember the first good day of trying to land (small) jumps in heavy powder on skiboards all those years ago... it was good fun. Such nice warm packing snow that I left at least 20 exact impressions of my facial features all over the hill.



    Quote Originally Posted by Fun Machine View Post
    I ride pretty much always centered. But I play in the park and ride switch all the time. These modern R8 and Spruce boards are far better built than those M7s.....
    Yeah, I'm not too concerned about breaking one of the new breed, and you're right on the DLPs.. those babies bounce right back when you put any sort of flex into the tails. If they'll take Dave's riding, mine is nothing by comparison.

    I've mentioned it elsewhere, but I'm kicking around the idea of having some carbon fibre mounting "risers" (I'd probably keep them fairly low, similar to Receptor height) made up to mount touring bindings on. I guess the idea would be to have them flex with the board when necessary and not create such a fulcrum point, as compared to aluminum. I also want to get a local CF equipment maker interested in skiboards, but I'm not going to be able to afford a custom pair any time soon!

    I ride pretty safe... only hit one tree this year, and I'm pretty sure it jumped into my path. I'm cautious on drops until I know the terrain, and had the luxury of riding a hill with lots of features that I could hit frequently to get the safe lines worked out. Hardpack groomers and park scare me though; I'll stick to tight glades, extreme pitches and a few little cliffs where it's safe.
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