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  1. #1 Spruce riser questions 
    Hardcore Skiboarder Ukuvox's Avatar
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    I got some new boots for Christmas, so I took my boards in the have the bindings adjusted. The shop called me the next day to tell me that Tyrolia will no longer indemnify the SL100 bindings. The shop will only adjust them if I sign a waiver. The other option is to have them install new bindings.
    • How risky is it to sign the waiver?
    • If I go with new bindings, do you have any recommendations? Can new bindings even be safely installed on an old riser?

    Any thoughts? All opinions would be appreciated.
    Spruce 120's (we'll see how this goes)
    Trikke Skki
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  2. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukuvox View Post
    I got some new boots for Christmas, so I took my boards in the have the bindings adjusted. The shop called me the next day to tell me that Tyrolia will no longer indemnify the SL100 bindings. The shop will only adjust them if I sign a waiver. The other option is to have them install new bindings.
    • How risky is it to sign the waiver?
    • If I go with new bindings, do you have any recommendations? Can new bindings even be safely installed on an old riser?

    Any thoughts? All opinions would be appreciated.
    Personally I feel that the indemnification itself is far less important than the actual safe and proper operation of the bindings. If the bindings fail to release when needed causing irreparable bodily harm, no amount of money would make up for that kind of injury. Tyrolia is no longer indemnifying the SL100 because they are too old, which means that statistically they have reached the end of their useful life. Your shop won't adjust unless you sign that waiver freeing them of liability. Your specific bindings might be in perfect condition and continue to function properly for years, but I feel that taking on that kind of risk is unnecessary when brand new, warrantied, indemnified replacement bindings can be bought for $100-200. I would reach out to Jeff @ Spruce for recommendations.
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  3. #3  
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    Wouldn’t it be something that youd just be able to adjust the bindings yourself? Slide the heel to the correct position?
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