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  1. #1 boots: what do you prefer. 
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    do you guys prefer a boot that feels (length wise) tighter than your use to or a boot that feels like your wearing tennis shoes? like i find myself getting a pair of normal shoes a full size up cuz i like the room but for ski boots do want a tighter fit or a little room?

    thanks!
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  2. #2  
    Mad Scientist of RVL8 Graphics dcox20's Avatar
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    depends on your toenail situation...
    Dave | Elevendy

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  3. #3  
    Hardcore Skiboarder mahatma's Avatar
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    I most definitely prefer a firm fit. Feet moving inside of boots creates pain and is less precise. I'm not into torture-tight but I like my boots to feel like their on my feet to perform a job.
    "It's no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society" Jiddu Krisnamurti

    Spruce Sherpa - RVL8 KTP - RVL8 Blunt XL
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  4. #4  
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    yea that makes sense. thanks for the reply.
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  5. #5  
    SBOLTeam III Rider eldiablodenieve's Avatar
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    would love both but I go with tight, if your foot can slide around in your boot you are risking injury and will not have as much control.
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  6. #6  
    CoFounder | Skiboardmagazine.com Roussel's Avatar
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    i boot fit for a lot of people per season at my job.

    you want a fitted boot, nothing loose.

    heres a article on skiboardmagazine that talks all about how to choose a boot

    http://sbmag.wordpress.com/2006/12/2...for-skiboards/
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  7. #7  
    SBOLTeam III Rider shims's Avatar
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    yeah i just got a pair of new boots and i was using some salomon versas in29.5 mondo but i bought my new salomon foils at 28.5 now i wanna see how muc difference its gonna make

    skiboards:
    Salomon Snowblde 88cm/1998
    BWP'08 w/snow jam extreme 2
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  8. #8  
    Skiboarder Mark's Avatar
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    if your foot easily slides it and wiggles around its probably too big. go to a bootfitter and get fitted. if the boot is too expensive, remember what size it was and purchase it online. don't tell them i told you though.


    ONE TIME I HUNG OUT WITH DAVE LYNAM IN PERSON

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  9. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    if your foot easily slides it and wiggles around its probably too big. go to a bootfitter and get fitted. if the boot is too expensive, remember what size it was and purchase it online. don't tell them i told you though.
    yeah very good idea. and no i wont tell them lol.
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  10. #10  
    Hardcore Skiboarder CrazyBoy-1's Avatar
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    I'm into high-speed carving, so I need a boot that has good lateral stiffness and a snug fit. I went with the Deeluxe Track 225's. The thermorflex liner was easy to mold at home and after a couple days of hard riding they are perfectly packed out. I really like the second buckle up that goes over the anckle. It helps to pull the heel back and keeps the foot from bouncing up and down over rougher conditions.
    RVL8 Condors - The Flex will be with me, always...until I break them

    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming... "WOW! WHAT A RIDE!!"
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  11. #11 my area of expertise 
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    My backround is that I used to fit skiboots. Now I build, modifiie, design, and fit shoes, orthotics and prosthetics as a board certified foot and ankle expert.

    In a skiboot your toe should just touch the front when your standing up. If you have a mortons toe (second toe longer than the big toe) make sure you go off that toe (thats more of an american trait). Otherwise go off the big toe. When you lean forward your toe should pull away from the front between 1/2 to a full thumb nails length.

    The Second thing is to take out the insole, which matches the last shape (the basic shape of any shoe or boot), and match your heel to the back of the insole and then center it between 1st and 5th met heads (the balls of your feet).
    You shouldn't be able to see the insole wider than your feet. if it is then you won't have any control. For example: When you go to hockey stop you will have to wait till your foot hits the side of the boot before you can control the board. Every motion takes longer and is excellerated causing more stress on the body.
    On the other hand, if the insole is narrower than any part of your foot then it will lift the 5th met locking the mid tarsle joints causing midtarsle and paraniel tendonitis (in other words your foot will hurt allot).

    The last thing I suggest is an insole. Nothing soft! In this sport it would hurt you more than it would help.
    Instead take one thats hard with a beveled (cupped) heel (Which gives you better edge control and pinches the fatty pad on your heel giving you 2.5 times more cushion than any man made matierial without losing stability) and an arch that contacts in the back of the arch ( this puts it under a bone called the navicular (that thing that buldges out under the ankle when you put weight on your foot).
    If you contact that bone with in a half a millimeter of its nuetural position you get 33% more muscle effectiveness. That means more strength, balance, and fewer injuries). dont support the middle of the arch which does nothing to help and risks blisters as well as takes cushion away from the body ( most important for you park junkies) and not the front of the arch which does all of the things the middle of the arch does but also risks the 1st MPJoint (the big toe\ball of the foot joint).
    The best way to do it is get a Functional custom orthotic ( one where they cast your foot in the air and position your foot in a nuetural position) or custom insole but those are both pricey. So if price is an issue then get Superfeet, Powerstep, or Sofsole stable runners. Place them on the insole you've taken out of your boot and place them against you foot with you toes flexed up. It should barely touch the back of the arch and abide by all the earlier rules.
    If you use a new insole, place the old insole on top match it to the heel and to where the balls of your feet sit and then trace around the old insole with a pen. then trim the new insole along the tracing so it fits the boots perfectly. from there throw out the old insoles

    Here is the sum up.

    1: When standing up the toes should barely touch the front and should pull away when you lean forward.

    2: Then match the insole toe your foot. It shouldn't be wider or narrower than any part of your foot except possibly your toes.

    3: Add new firm cupped arch support insoles for 33% more muscle effectiveness for more strength, balance, edge control, and fewer injuries. Make sure it barely touches the back of your arch, not the front or the middle, and that it follows the same rules as the original insole. Trim it to the shape of the original insole by tracing and throw out the original.
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  12. #12  
    Mad Scientist of RVL8 Graphics dcox20's Avatar
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    G can we sticky hyperguys post?

    seems like a lot of great info!
    Dave | Elevendy

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  13. #13 unique 
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    These rule will help knowing that each foot is unique. Therefore each person needs a different boot. The boot that fits me will probably hurt you. Either go to a store and try them on or order a whole bunch of boots from a site with a fantastic return policy. Remember, with exception of flex, there is no such thing as braking in a boot and molding a boot can't correct a last(the basic part the shoe or boot is built on to get its shape) that doesn't fit your foot.
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  14. #14  
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    woooow! awesome info thanks alot! that helps alot on finding boots.
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  15. #15  
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    Make sure you try on your ski boots with the same socks and insoles you're going to skiboard in.
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