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  1. #16  
    Skiboarder Mark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hyperguy View Post
    My backround is that I used to fit skiboots. Now I build, modifiie, design, and fit shoes, orthotics and prosthetics as a board certified foot and ankle expert.

    In a skiboot your toe should just touch the front when your standing up. If you have a mortons toe (second toe longer than the big toe) make sure you go off that toe (thats more of an american trait). Otherwise go off the big toe. When you lean forward your toe should pull away from the front between 1/2 to a full thumb nails length.

    The Second thing is to take out the insole, which matches the last shape (the basic shape of any shoe or boot), and match your heel to the back of the insole and then center it between 1st and 5th met heads (the balls of your feet).
    You shouldn't be able to see the insole wider than your feet. if it is then you won't have any control. For example: When you go to hockey stop you will have to wait till your foot hits the side of the boot before you can control the board. Every motion takes longer and is excellerated causing more stress on the body.
    On the other hand, if the insole is narrower than any part of your foot then it will lift the 5th met locking the mid tarsle joints causing midtarsle and paraniel tendonitis (in other words your foot will hurt allot).

    The last thing I suggest is an insole. Nothing soft! In this sport it would hurt you more than it would help.
    Instead take one thats hard with a beveled (cupped) heel (Which gives you better edge control and pinches the fatty pad on your heel giving you 2.5 times more cushion than any man made matierial without losing stability) and an arch that contacts in the back of the arch ( this puts it under a bone called the navicular (that thing that buldges out under the ankle when you put weight on your foot).
    If you contact that bone with in a half a millimeter of its nuetural position you get 33% more muscle effectiveness. That means more strength, balance, and fewer injuries). dont support the middle of the arch which does nothing to help and risks blisters as well as takes cushion away from the body ( most important for you park junkies) and not the front of the arch which does all of the things the middle of the arch does but also risks the 1st MPJoint (the big toe\ball of the foot joint).
    The best way to do it is get a Functional custom orthotic ( one where they cast your foot in the air and position your foot in a nuetural position) or custom insole but those are both pricey. So if price is an issue then get Superfeet, Powerstep, or Sofsole stable runners. Place them on the insole you've taken out of your boot and place them against you foot with you toes flexed up. It should barely touch the back of the arch and abide by all the earlier rules.
    If you use a new insole, place the old insole on top match it to the heel and to where the balls of your feet sit and then trace around the old insole with a pen. then trim the new insole along the tracing so it fits the boots perfectly. from there throw out the old insoles

    Here is the sum up.

    1: When standing up the toes should barely touch the front and should pull away when you lean forward.

    2: Then match the insole toe your foot. It shouldn't be wider or narrower than any part of your foot except possibly your toes.

    3: Add new firm cupped arch support insoles for 33% more muscle effectiveness for more strength, balance, edge control, and fewer injuries. Make sure it barely touches the back of your arch, not the front or the middle, and that it follows the same rules as the original insole. Trim it to the shape of the original insole by tracing and throw out the original.
    wow. you're good. i want to talk to you about feet sometime. really.


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  2. #17  
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hyperguy View Post
    These rule will help knowing that each foot is unique. Therefore each person needs a different boot. The boot that fits me will probably hurt you. Either go to a store and try them on or order a whole bunch of boots from a site with a fantastic return policy. Remember, with exception of flex, there is no such thing as braking in a boot and molding a boot can't correct a last(the basic part the shoe or boot is built on to get its shape) that doesn't fit your foot.
    Great info hyperguy.

    Can punching out a shell allow a wider last foot to fit in a narrow last boot? Is there a limit in how much can be punched out?


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  3. #18  
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    Hi all,

    I am thinking of buying the sherpa's with the Spruce 2009 Pro Prime Risers & Release Bindings. Important to know are these boots compatible with the pro prime risers and wich boots would the best buy?

    For this I want to buy some cheap boots and I'v found the following:

    the Rossignol SAS F2 skiboots or

    the Dalbello Aerro 55 or

    the Rossignol Axium X or

    the Tecnica Mega+ X Conforfit Silver Black / Tecnica Mega 8 UltraFit / or

    the Head Edge+ 8.5 Black Red
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  4. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin View Post
    Hi all,

    I am thinking of buying the sherpa's with the Spruce 2009 Pro Prime Risers & Release Bindings. Important to know are these boots compatible with the pro prime risers and wich boots would the best buy?

    For this I want to buy some cheap boots and I'v found the following:

    the Rossignol SAS F2 skiboots or

    the Dalbello Aerro 55 or

    the Rossignol Axium X or

    the Tecnica Mega+ X Conforfit Silver Black / Tecnica Mega 8 UltraFit / or

    the Head Edge+ 8.5 Black Red
    The boot that would be the best buy would be the boot that fits your foot best. Go try em' out.

    Avoid boots with a pronounced forward lean.
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  5. #20  
    Hardcore Skiboarder shortydude's Avatar
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    I would not be able to ski at all if it weren't for my Kneissl soft boots. I have a plate and several screws in my leg where I broke both bones right at the top of my ski boot. My soft boots are a cross between snowboard and ski boots. I wouldn't race in them. But, for general skiing they can't be beat for comfort. Regular ski boots are literally torture devices for my leg when buckled. The soft boots have thick padded removable liners with rubber soles that I walk in to/from the hill (no need to carry extra shoes). Inside the liners I wear custom footbeds and a second set of insoles to take up any slop inside the boots. These boots have Walk/Ski switches on the back. But I never use the walk feature that unlocks the foot/cuff joint. When these wear out, break, get lost or stolen I will definitely get another pair.
    They look like this except mine have a ratchet strap in the middle and two velcro straps.
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  6. #21  
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    Just recently I have bought a few pairs of old rear entry boots from ebay. Typically they are around 15 to 20 years old and cost around 25 to 40 dollars. I have become very disillusioned with being forced into seudo race boots for recreational skiing and wanted to re-visit what I remembered as comfortable easy to live with boots. So far, DELIGHTED with the results.
    This is what I mean by easy to live with......

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  7. #22  
    Hardcore Skiboarder PeteJE's Avatar
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    Since it came up, I can add my strong endorsement for my Atomic Hawx80 ski boots. They are extremely comfortable; snug like a ski boot, but not torture at all - I never even loosen a buckle all day, even on breaks. What I like is they are more upright, softer flex, and have shell cut out flex areas near the fore foot (different from their "live fit" line) that allow real good forefoot flex for stomping down on edges. They allow this without being loose inside at all. I think they are a great skiboard boot.
    http://www.skis.com/mens-ski-boots/c...1-p196584.html
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  8. #23  
    Skiboarder rob's Avatar
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    I have Salomon Verses and they are becoming pretty unbearable. After a few runs my calves, ankles and feet get extremely sore. Can anyone recommend a more comfortable boot and maybe one that has a walk mode? I need to get rid of these ASAP.
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  9. #24  
    Hardcore Skiboarder mahatma's Avatar
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    I'm lovin' my Head i-10's. Nice and wide toebox, firm but not painful, super easy walking, getting in and out is almost as easy as a regular pair of boots, nice upright stance. Plus, the single top buckle solves my biggest problem with ski boots - very real pain from the pressure the #3 buckle normally places just above the ankle. I snapped off my left tib and fib right at the ankle some years back and that 3rd buckle makes life hell.

    I think this weekend I'll get custom liners cooked in over lunch on Sat or Sun. All depends on how juicy the pow is.
    "It's no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society" Jiddu Krisnamurti

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  10. #25  
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    i've got the same Head I Type 10s on order and hope i have the same success, for $120 bucks if they are a comfortable as people say they're a steal.
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  11. #26  
    Hardcore Skiboarder valmorel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chacend View Post
    i've got the same Head I Type 10s on order and hope i have the same success, for $120 bucks if they are a comfortable as people say they're a steal.
    SUPER comfortable and dead easy to walk in.
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  12. #27  
    Skiboarder rob's Avatar
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    Are Head I-10s the best out? What would everyone consider the top of the line boot that's out right now?
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  13. #28  
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob View Post
    Are Head I-10s the best out? What would everyone consider the top of the line boot that's out right now?
    That really depends on what type of boot you are looking for. The Head I-type is categorized as "All Day Comfort".
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  14. #29  
    Skiboarder rob's Avatar
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    The most comfortable without sacrificing performance.
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  15. #30  
    Hardcore Skiboarder shortydude's Avatar
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    Level9 ran out of my size in the i-type 10's (flex 70) so I went for the i-type 8's (flex 60). So far I've only worn them around the house doing a snow dance (clothed). They are nice boots but the upper buckle doesn't loosen up enough for me. I have a plate and screws in my leg and can't stand much pressure on it. I need a longer buckle wire bail. I love the shells, but the liners are too thick and I can't stand the pain long enough to pack them in.

    I think the liners are thermo-molding so I may be able to heat them up in the oven a bit, put them on and clamp them down for as long and hard as I can stand to force them to pack in. Or, maybe I could do that with a piece of PVC pipe so I can use more heat and pressure to pack in the liner.

    I'll start a separate thread so I don't hijack this one.
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