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  1. #91  
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    Nice set up. You are going to enjoy them.

    Be sure to post your review.


    132 Osprey, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, 110 Condor (Green), 109 Spliff

    Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

    Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


    Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

    Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts
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  2. #92  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    So I guess I can post my review here!

    First of all, it's a lot harder on the thighs than I thought! Maybe my stance is wrong but at the end of the day, my thighs were killing me and were super sore! Aside from that, it went pretty well.

    Initial feeling of putting them on and moving was trippy! It felt like I was levitating. One of the big differences between skiis and skiboards is the proximity of your boot to the snow. On my first run down, I felt slightly out of control. Of course, it was the first run! Haha! But my initial comparison is that the skiboards were responding to my moves but it FELT like they weren't.

    After that initial run, my friends decided to go harder! (We hit up a Black Diamond....which up here at our baby resort is probably closer to a very hard blue in most places). I felt a bit better on the turns but one thing I realized is that I prefer a lot wider hills for carving. Little mini carves were a bit difficult initially and I ended up doing semi pizzas in the end on the turns HAHA!

    We did some back groomed trails through the trees and that was interesting. I find they pick up a lot of speed pretty easily and it was fun but not as controlled as on skis.

    We went to the terrain park for a bit but everything there was huge (in the sense that I was WAY too uncomfortable so I was the guy that went in between everything! :P But I did land a few small jumps later in the day.

    Overall, interesting first experience. When I started on the slopes, I was definitely pumped up and everything started to come together. The weird stance, the low carves that allowed me to touch the snow (that was cool!), and the reactions from people around me going wTF ARE THOSE?! Haha! Just need to get a bit more in shape since this was my first run of the season and my thighs and calves are pretty sore today! :P

    Hopefully, with a few more runs, I'll get way more comfortable and I can stick with this for the long run!
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  3. #93  
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    .................First of all, it's a lot harder on the thighs than I thought! Maybe my stance is wrong but at the end of the day, my thighs were killing me and were super sore! Aside from that, it went pretty well...........
    Try staying centered and do not tuck down in a squat. Stand taller with a slight bend in your knees to absorb the terrain and your thighs will appreciate it.


    132 Osprey, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, 110 Condor (Green), 109 Spliff

    Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

    Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


    Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

    Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts
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  4. #94  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    Sorry I've got to ask you guys. What's the difference been rockered condors and regular condors.

    In addition, what's the difference between condors and revolts
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  5. #95  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    Sorry I've got to ask you guys. What's the difference been rockered condors and regular condors.

    In addition, what's the difference between condors and revolts
    The difference between the RCs and regular Condors is in the name. The RCs are a "rockered" ski shape while the regular condors are a cambered construction. For a more details on ski shapes here is a resource. ---> http://www.evo.com/rocker-guide-what...it-matter.aspx.

    The Revolts cambered like the regular Condors but are smaller -- Revolts are narrower and shorter. There is a comparison chart here on SBOL ----> http://www.skiboardsonline.com/BRDS.html
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "STS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  6. #96  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Ukuvox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow View Post
    Welcome to the SBOL forum of skiboarding fanatics.

    A number of resources are available and can be found in the following links:

    -snip-
    Wow, a lot of good info here and with the season drawing to a close, I get the feeling I'm going to be reading this A LOT before I ever get a chance to even try skiboarding next winter.
    Thanks!
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  7. #97  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    I'm still relatively new so here's another question.

    How do skiboards fare in icy conditions for you? I was at Killington this past weekend and found either I suck or skiboards weren't that great in the icy conditions (like icy powder). I wasn't able to dig in like I could on the packed snow/powder at Owl's Head.
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  8. #98  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bluewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    I'm still relatively new so here's another question.

    How do skiboards fare in icy conditions for you? I was at Killington this past weekend and found either I suck or skiboards weren't that great in the icy conditions (like icy powder). I wasn't able to dig in like I could on the packed snow/powder at Owl's Head.
    It depends - on a lot of things. The boards and their design figure into it. For example, for me 120s are not good in icy conditions. Not enough edge grip no matter how I ride them or how sharp the edges are. Board tune and maintenance are important. Smooth edges (ie, no knicks) and sharp edges are critical. Base and side angles are important too. Especially base. If you can learn to ride a board with a more aggressive nature then a zero degree base angle can significantly improve edge grip. How you ride on icy conditions matters too. I keep my stance a bit narrower (feet slightly closer together ), my weight really centered over my boots and my center of gravity a bit lower (hands a bit lower and arms closer to my body ) and basically try to "jam" my full weight right through my boots down into the direct center of the boards on icier surfaces.

    I used to hate riding on icier surfaces but this year I really focused on adjusting my style on ice. The Sherpas were big for me (pun intended I guess) in getting comfortsble on ice. They carve rails on anything if ridden properly. As kirk has pointed out on ice you also have to sometimes ride faster than you want and wait to turn where you can so you don't do things that the surface won't let you.
    In pursuit of Peace, Harmony and Flow.....
    Think Like a Mountain

    Boards ridden, some owned: Sherpas, Spruce 120 "STS", Blunts, DS110 custom prototypes, Rockered Condors, Revolts, DLPs, Summit Custom 110s, Summit Marauders, Head 94s, Raptor prototypes, Osprey prototypes.
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  9. #99  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluewing View Post
    It depends - on a lot of things. The boards and their design figure into it. For example, for me 120s are not good in icy conditions. Not enough edge grip no matter how I ride them or how sharp the edges are. Board tune and maintenance are important. Smooth edges (ie, no knicks) and sharp edges are critical. Base and side angles are important too. Especially base. If you can learn to ride a board with a more aggressive nature then a zero degree base angle can significantly improve edge grip. How you ride on icy conditions matters too. I keep my stance a bit narrower (feet slightly closer together ), my weight really centered over my boots and my center of gravity a bit lower (hands a bit lower and arms closer to my body ) and basically try to "jam" my full weight right through my boots down into the direct center of the boards on icier surfaces.

    I used to hate riding on icier surfaces but this year I really focused on adjusting my style on ice. The Sherpas were big for me (pun intended I guess) in getting comfortsble on ice. They carve rails on anything if ridden properly. As kirk has pointed out on ice you also have to sometimes ride faster than you want and wait to turn where you can so you don't do things that the surface won't let you.
    Thanks for those tips. I guess since this is my first season, I have to figure out how to maintain the board now in the offseason haha! I just felt pretty out of control with my setup. I did have a wider stance on the turns but that's because my lead leg kept sliding all over the place. Maybe I was just tired and didn't step into it with all my weight.

    In addition, I'm not sure if being on the pro risers added to the instability. At those times, I felt like if I were closer to the board, it may have made a difference. Can you comment on that? Receptor vs. risers feel?

    Cheers BW!
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  10. #100  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bluewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    Thanks for those tips. I guess since this is my first season, I have to figure out how to maintain the board now in the offseason haha! I just felt pretty out of control with my setup. I did have a wider stance on the turns but that's because my lead leg kept sliding all over the place. Maybe I was just tired and didn't step into it with all my weight.

    In addition, I'm not sure if being on the pro risers added to the instability. At those times, I felt like if I were closer to the board, it may have made a difference. Can you comment on that? Receptor vs. risers feel?

    Cheers BW!
    I don't ride non-release so can't speak directly to that. However, I would think the riser with its height would give good leverage which equates to higher pressures underfoot that can be generated.

    Another factor on ice is angulation vs leaning. Angulation is very important - you get good force generated and are keeping your legs "under you". Leaning lessens the pressure you are generating and it gets your legs "away" from you. Leaning on ice = sliding. I also focus on "rolling" my ankles when it is really icy - smaller angulation angles, smaller edge angles but trying to get more pressure right underfoot by rolling my foot in my boot to the inside to try and get that inside edge pressure up.

    Edge maintenance is easy. Get a decent multi-angle edge tuning tool like you can get at sbol (http://www.skiboardsonline.com/p/saa_edgetool.html) or one that has a dial to allow for multiple angles at 0.5 degree increments at Tognar Toolworks. Get a gummi stone for working out knicks. Tognar has some simple how-to articles if you poke around. Edge maintenance and tuning is not difficult and only takes a few minutes to do. I personally check my edges after each time I go out (check them for knicks and use the fingernail test for sharpness). I probably sharpen at least every 3rd time out - after each time if I rode in hard, chunky conditions.
    In pursuit of Peace, Harmony and Flow.....
    Think Like a Mountain

    Boards ridden, some owned: Sherpas, Spruce 120 "STS", Blunts, DS110 custom prototypes, Rockered Condors, Revolts, DLPs, Summit Custom 110s, Summit Marauders, Head 94s, Raptor prototypes, Osprey prototypes.
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  11. #101  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post

    How do skiboards fare in icy conditions for you? I was at Killington this past weekend and found either I suck or skiboards weren't that great in the icy conditions (like icy powder). I wasn't able to dig in like I could on the packed snow/powder at Owl's Head.
    Another nice thing about skiboards is the way they give you instant feedback and the ability to safely experiment with technique. They really are a great self learning tool. There are many ways to achieve good results, just let your boards guide you.

    I used to dread ice, but discovered two ways to make it fun this year. The Blunts with their zero camber are perfect for just sliding across the ice in a controlled way. You just get a soft edge and drift around the corners. The cambered Jades are great for digging in a sharp edge in and carving. They are like a pair of ice skates. Two very different techniques on different types of boards.

    I would trust the set up you have (Chickens and risers?) and let the boards to show you how to do it.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  12. #102  
    Skiboarder WVhills's Avatar
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    I am with Bad Wolf, I would trust the chickens... ha. This was my first season on skiboards and initially had the thigh burn. In my opinion it happened because I was fighting the board too much. You often see folks on here talk about letting the board do the work, once you get more comfortable with them that is exactly what happens and it is a lot easier. I doubt anyone on here really cares to ride on ice but the more familiar you are with your boards the better you will be able to address any situation. Kind of a long way to say keep practicing With only one season down I still have a lot to learn but I really like them and the opportunity they made for me to keep sliding with my daughter! Slide On....
    Just getting started in skiboards
    2013 Spruce 120 Chairlifts and risers
    Revel8 Revolt Trees and spruce risers
    Dalbello Axion 11 boots
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  13. #103  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluewing View Post
    I don't ride non-release so can't speak directly to that. However, I would think the riser with its height would give good leverage which equates to higher pressures underfoot that can be generated.

    Another factor on ice is angulation vs leaning. Angulation is very important - you get good force generated and are keeping your legs "under you". Leaning lessens the pressure you are generating and it gets your legs "away" from you. Leaning on ice = sliding. I also focus on "rolling" my ankles when it is really icy - smaller angulation angles, smaller edge angles but trying to get more pressure right underfoot by rolling my foot in my boot to the inside to try and get that inside edge pressure up.

    Edge maintenance is easy. Get a decent multi-angle edge tuning tool like you can get at sbol (http://www.skiboardsonline.com/p/saa_edgetool.html) or one that has a dial to allow for multiple angles at 0.5 degree increments at Tognar Toolworks. Get a gummi stone for working out knicks. Tognar has some simple how-to articles if you poke around. Edge maintenance and tuning is not difficult and only takes a few minutes to do. I personally check my edges after each time I go out (check them for knicks and use the fingernail test for sharpness). I probably sharpen at least every 3rd time out - after each time if I rode in hard, chunky conditions.
    What you say here is true. I do get more force generated with the riser but I feel uncomfortable with the feel of them. I feel a little too far up there and although I can get good leverage, when going over bumps and whatnot, I feel a tad unstable.

    Regarding ice, I think I get what you're saying. Looking back, I was definitely leaning more on my back leg once I started sliding. I guess I could try and stay a bit more centred and comfortable. I did not though, that when I was on less icy conditions (second day), I was able to do what I wanted with the board on snow/packed powder. I guess I just need a bit more work on my technique. After all, still only my first season! I'd probably have to work on tuning the board. I was also thinking of purchasing another pair sometime next season. Just so I can get two boards to play with and it will allow me to start feeling out which one might be better for me. And I've heard really good things about both RC and Blunts. Maybe I'll even install Receptors on it so I can feel the difference between the two and that way I can understand where I want to go, moving forward! (Heck! What if I go snowboard bindings!) Haha!!! I love that I have so many options!!!
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  14. #104  
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    Riser plates are used (and regulated) in competitive skiing because they carve so well on ice.

    But the risers do add instability, and might in fact be giving you a bit of a hard time learning on ice, because of the very fact that they carve so well - they make the transition between sliding and carving much more abrupt.

    In my limited experience on ice, I tend to take a wide stance. As I enter the turn, commit to either sliding or carving, depending on the conditions of each turn. Once a slide starts (intentionally or not), do not try to get back on edge - rather, just gently change the angulation of the ski until you cancel out some of the sideways motion while sliding. Once you are comfortable with the speed - point downhill, and start your next carve/slide in the opposite direction.
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  15. #105  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    Ok. Once again, just had a few questions. I'm looking into the demo program next year to try out some skiboards. It may give me an idea of what to go after the Revolts. But I did have a few questions.

    1) Since this program is only available to riders in continental USA, would it be possible to ship it to a hotel for my use? Upon completion, I would mail it back I assume. Does it come in a bag? Or just packaging?
    2) I know that the "demo program" offers a future discount towards the purchase of that set. If I were to rent a pair for the weekend and then rent another pair, does that stack up towards the one that I want to purchase? (Ex. If I rented two setups and I wanted to purchase 1 after, will the discount be for both rentals?)
    3) If I were to purchase the skiboard after renting, would it be the pair that I used or a brand new pair? (Are the demo ones used or new?)
    4) What type of waxing will they come with? Regular or factory wax?

    I know there are a lot of questions here but I just wanted to try a few and then decide what my first official skiboard purchase should be for next season!

    On another note, I was browsing around regarding top sheets and noticed the link ==> here <== that talks about chamfering. It looks relatively simple and awesome. My question for that, if anyone has experience, is that if you chamfer it, are you also scraping the top sheet? If so, does it create any gaps between the top sheet and the board? (Just curious as to whether something can catch in between that layer of the top sheet.

    I HAVE TOO MANY QUESTIONS! SOMEONE STOP ME! I NEED A SKI BOARDING PRO TO COME TO CANADA AND WALK ME THROUGH MAINTENANCE! HAHAHA!
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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