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  1. #106  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    Ok. Once again, just had a few questions. I'm looking into the demo program next year to try out some skiboards. It may give me an idea of what to go after the Revolts. But I did have a few questions.

    1) Since this program is only available to riders in continental USA, would it be possible to ship it to a hotel for my use? Upon completion, I would mail it back I assume. Does it come in a bag? Or just packaging?
    2) I know that the "demo program" offers a future discount towards the purchase of that set. If I were to rent a pair for the weekend and then rent another pair, does that stack up towards the one that I want to purchase? (Ex. If I rented two setups and I wanted to purchase 1 after, will the discount be for both rentals?)
    3) If I were to purchase the skiboard after renting, would it be the pair that I used or a brand new pair? (Are the demo ones used or new?)
    4) What type of waxing will they come with? Regular or factory wax?

    I know there are a lot of questions here but I just wanted to try a few and then decide what my first official skiboard purchase should be for next season!
    The demo questions are best answered by Greco @ SBOL who would be providing them to you. Email him at info@skiboardsonline.com . And if you really want to try a lot of boards try to connect with other riders in your area or at one of the events like ShredFest.

    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    On another note, I was browsing around regarding top sheets and noticed the link ==> here <== that talks about chamfering. It looks relatively simple and awesome. My question for that, if anyone has experience, is that if you chamfer it, are you also scraping the top sheet? If so, does it create any gaps between the top sheet and the board? (Just curious as to whether something can catch in between that layer of the top sheet.
    Chamfering is cutting back the top sheet and sidewall materail. You are essentially knocking the corner off the top edge of the sidewall. To prevent and delamination of the layers when doing this I suggest that you file the edge with a downward stroke only not an up and down sawing motion. This will prevent the file from catching the top sheet, lifting it, and creating any "gaps".
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "STS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  2. #107  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    On another note, I was browsing around regarding top sheets and noticed the link ==> here <== that talks about chamfering. It looks relatively simple and awesome. My question for that, if anyone has experience, is that if you chamfer it, are you also scraping the top sheet? If so, does it create any gaps between the top sheet and the board? (Just curious as to whether something can catch in between that layer of the top sheet.
    I know many of the members have chamfered their own boards using a file and guide or even a hand sander. I have never done it to brand new boards but do use a sander on them once the edges start to get chipped. The Blunts and the re-released "Melting Cloud" 2012 RCs both have a new finish to their edges; they seem to be "factory chamfered. They are much more durable than the old style and resist chipping and scratching. Maybe more of the boards will come out with this new and improved edge next season?
    Just these, nothing else !

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  3. #108  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
    I know many of the members have chamfered their own boards using a file and guide or even a hand sander. I have never done it to brand new boards but do use a sander on them once the edges start to get chipped. The Blunts and the re-released "Melting Cloud" 2012 RCs both have a new finish to their edges; they seem to be "factory chamfered. They are much more durable than the old style and resist chipping and scratching. Maybe more of the boards will come out with this new and improved edge next season?

    Interesting! I was wondering about that because I'm debating between the Blunts or the RCs for next season and wanted to maintain them to the best condition I can! That's why I was asking about chamfering etc. Also, in regards to waxing boards, I know most of you guys do it yourself. But would regular ski/board shops wax the skiboards the same way? (Curious as to whether they've seen or if any different waxing techniques because my buddy knows the owner of a store and gets discounts on waxing and some gear). If so, I'd just bring my gear in with him and get it waxed together.

    Also, in regards to new boards with the factory wax, is it better to hit the slopes at least once with them before getting them waxed or should you put an additional layer over that immediately?

    YAY BOARD MAINTENANCE! (Maybe if I get better too, I can come join you guys at Shredfest or join the East Coast skiboarders!)
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  4. #109  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bluewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    But would regular ski/board shops wax the skiboards the same way? (Curious as to whether they've seen or if any different waxing techniques because my buddy knows the owner of a store and gets discounts on waxing and some gear). If so, I'd just bring my gear in with him and get it waxed together.
    The waxing should not be any different for a skiboard. I would definitely recommend you get your own iron, wax scraper, wax and edge tuning tools and do all of that yourself. Wax and proper edge maintenance are keys for your boards performing well. I wax my boards pretty much after each time I use them. Hot wax every 2-3 times out and then paste wax touchups in between. I also check my edges each time after I ride and take care of any knicks. Sharpen the edges about every 3 times out and also if I know it will be icy.

    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    Also, in regards to new boards with the factory wax, is it better to hit the slopes at least once with them before getting them waxed or should you put an additional layer over that immediately?
    Factory wax is basically just to help protect the bases during shipment. For new boards I apply hot wax and do a hot scrape (don't let the wax cool) to lift off the factory wax. Then, I give them a nice hot waxing. It typically takes a few times hot waxing before the bases are saturated so I typically hot wax new boards after each time out for the first 3 or 4 times until the wax starts to last and I don't see any graying on the bases after 1 time out.
    In pursuit of Peace, Harmony and Flow.....
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    Boards ridden, some owned: Sherpas, Spruce 120 "STS", Blunts, DS110 custom prototypes, Rockered Condors, Revolts, DLPs, Summit Custom 110s, Summit Marauders, Head 94s, Raptor prototypes, Osprey prototypes.
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  5. #110  
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post

    Also, in regards to new boards with the factory wax, is it better to hit the slopes at least once with them before getting them waxed or should you put an additional layer over that immediately?
    I wax and tune my own boards as well. The equipment to do so doesn't really cost much and pays for itself after the few few weeks. More than anything it gets you into the habit of inspecting your boards bases and edges for easy to fix damage. I think looking after your own gear adds to the enjoyment of the sport and will keep your boards in better condition than a shop will. There are tons of videos online showing you how to wax and tune at home. The Tognar Toolworks catalog also has hints and tips pages along with the products for sale, they will send you a copy.

    Sempai checks his boards after every use. He takes the bindings off, wipes them down and checks the bases and edges for nicks. All his boards look like the day he bought them. Well, almost!

    How often to wax is a great subject. Some, like me and Bluewing do it every time out, some every couple of weeks, some once a season and some never. My wife didn't wax her boards for several seasons and it didn't seem to affect their performance. Sometimes good bases is all you need.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  6. #111  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wushuguy View Post
    Interesting! I was wondering about that because I'm debating between the Blunts or the RCs for next season and wanted to maintain them to the best condition I can! That's why I was asking about chamfering etc.
    With the new edge design I wouldn't worry about chamfering the Blunts or 2012 RCs.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  7. #112  
    SBOLTeam III Rider sempai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
    Sempai checks his boards after every use. He takes the bindings off, wipes them down and checks the bases and edges for nicks. All his boards look like the day he bought them. Well, almost!
    Not exactly accurate. I don't remove the bindings. I do wipe them down and check for damage after every use. If there are nicks or splinters coming off the sidewalls, I sand them down in hopes that they won't get worse.

    Skiboards:
    2013 Spruce Sherpas w/Tyrolia Peak 11s
    2015 RVL8 Blunt XLs w/Tyrolia Attack 13s
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Ickys w/Tyrolia SX 10s

    Skis:
    2012 Icelantic Keepers w/Salomon Z12s
    2015 Blizzard Regulators
    w/Rossignol Axial3 120s

    Boots:
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    Past boards: Salomon Snowblades, Line MNPs 89 & 98 cm, Five-Os, Bullets, Jedis, Spruce 120s, LE 125s, Ospreys
    Summit 110s, Nomads, Jades, RVL8 ALPs, BWPs, KTPs, Tanshos, Rockets, DLPs, Blunts, Condors, RCs, Revolts, Spliffs
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  8. #113  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sempai View Post
    Not exactly accurate. I don't remove the bindings. I do wipe them down and check for damage after every use. If there are nicks or splinters coming off the sidewalls, I sand them down in hopes that they won't get worse.
    I take mine off. It really bugs me to clean my boards then have some dirty ice melt leak out from under the binding and have to clean them again. Not that I'm OCD or anything.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  9. #114  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    i may do that too but at the moment, I'm too lazy for that! I just tilt it and let it leak out from the side onto a towel.
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  10. #115  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    Last post was in April from my last trip so I thought I'd get things started with another newbie question. Since I'm heading into my 2nd season, I just wanted to ask a few questions because I was pretty confused.

    1) In regards to non-release Receptor bindings, I understand that it offers a bit tighter connection with the skiboard. However, in all my experience up to this point, I've only ever used release bindings (or non-release ones while snowboarding). I've never used the "bearclamps" before and not entirely sure how they work. If someone could link me a video/thread explaining how they lock into place or what type of special boot you need, that'd be great.

    I'm debating whether or not to get a pair and use them as backup in case softboot non-release doesn't work out too well. (Nice to have a backup!) And with regards to boots, anything in particular I should be looking out for? For example, Full Tilt High Fives seem to look pretty sweet.

    2) In regards to upgrading your own snowboard bindings, is there anything in particular you need to look for? I'm just curious as to what would qualify.

    Thanks for your help in advance and here's to another solid season on the slopes!
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  11. #116  
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    Release bindings have springs in their mechanism which naturally have a little more "give" to them and are often mounted on risers.

    Non release bindings have very little give and can be directly mounted, hence the tighter feel. Obviously the bindings made out of metal and with thick bales are better than the cheap snowblade composite bindings. They work with any hard ski boot that will fit in a standard release binding.

    Rear bale hooks over the shelf on the heel




    Toe piece levers onto the front of the boot and locks in place




    Can be a pain to get on in the cold and ice, but gives a great connection to the board
    Just these, nothing else !

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  12. #117  
    Hardcore Skiboarder wushuguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
    Release bindings have springs in their mechanism which naturally have a little more "give" to them and are often mounted on risers.

    Non release bindings have very little give and can be directly mounted, hence the tighter feel. Obviously the bindings made out of metal and with thick bales are better than the cheap snowblade composite bindings. They work with any hard ski boot that will fit in a standard release binding.

    Rear bale hooks over the shelf on the heel




    Toe piece levers onto the front of the boot and locks in place




    Can be a pain to get on in the cold and ice, but gives a great connection to the board
    Thanks for the detailed response as usual! I finally understand the heel aspect of it. I'm just curious though. Does the front "lock" into place on the ridge too? So it's more like a tight clip on that clicks? Or do oyu have to adjust the front part each time you put on your boot?
    Riding: RVL8 '15 Rockered Condors
    Bindings: RVL8 '15 Black Receptors | Tyrolia Attack 13 Release Bindings
    Boots: Full Tilt '14 Booters - 27.5

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  13. #118  
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    If you go with release bindings, when ordering you will be asked your height, weight, age, and boot sole length. The bindings will be adjusted for you prior to being shipped.
    http://www.spruceski.com/downloads.html
    My question to this is, I gave them my info and my boots do fit correctly into the bindings, but the bindings came with a tag that said they should be adjusted by a pro. This was also seconded by Greco as they didn't have my boot and did it to specs. Do I need to have the bindings adjusted by a pro or are they fine?
    99 Salomon Skiblades
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    15 Blunt XL
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  14. #119  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bluewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by STILL BOARDING View Post
    If you go with release bindings, when ordering you will be asked your height, weight, age, and boot sole length. The bindings will be adjusted for you prior to being shipped.
    http://www.spruceski.com/downloads.html
    My question to this is, I gave them my info and my boots do fit correctly into the bindings, but the bindings came with a tag that said they should be adjusted by a pro. This was also seconded by Greco as they didn't have my boot and did it to specs. Do I need to have the bindings adjusted by a pro or are they fine?
    The tag saying the bindings should be adjusted by a pro is a liability protection for SBOL/Spruce because the final step in setting up the bindings is to verify the forward pressure setting. If you are not knowledgeable about and/or comfortable checking the forward pressure setting - then definitely take the bindings and your boots to a local shop and have this final adjustment done.

    If you don't know how to verify the forward pressure setting, search around forum for one or more posts on it. If you can't find anything, PM me with you email address and I will send you some documentation. It is not difficult to do - I do it on my and my daughter's bindings. However, if in doubt, take them to a shop. They might do it for free or at the very most a nomimal charge. Incorrect forward pressure setting could result in pre-release (your binding releases when it is not supposed to) or non-release (binding doesn't release when it is supposed to) - both of which are undesirable.
    In pursuit of Peace, Harmony and Flow.....
    Think Like a Mountain

    Boards ridden, some owned: Sherpas, Spruce 120 "STS", Blunts, DS110 custom prototypes, Rockered Condors, Revolts, DLPs, Summit Custom 110s, Summit Marauders, Head 94s, Raptor prototypes, Osprey prototypes.
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  15. #120  
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    Thank you Bluewing, I'll check the forum for threads, I don't mind doing the adjustment myself. If I can't find what I need, I'll PM you!!
    99 Salomon Skiblades
    02 Line Fly
    10 Head Salamander
    12 Head Hot Rod 94s'
    15 Blunt XL
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