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  1. #1 Skiboard Selection Table 
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    The linked skiboard selection table is presented as a general guideline and starting point to aid you in narrowing your skiboard options that are appropriate for your height, weight, binding preference and anticipated riding conditions.



    http://www.skiboardsonline.com/image...able090927.JPG

    Note: For improved image quality, select the photobucket link below the image, left mouse click the image that appears, and it will zoom in at a higher resolution. You can then use the slider bars to view the area of interest in the table. You may also find it easier to use when printed on legal (14 x 8.5) size paper.

    BACKGROUND:

    The minimum rider heights are dictated by the binding type (release or non-release) as published on the SBOL website. Note that the minimum height requirements are independent of riding conditions/application. Please respect these minimum rider height recommendations by binding type to avoid injury.

    • Ranges shown in yellow are for skiboards with release bindings only
    • Ranges shown in blue and purple are for skiboards with release and non-release bindings

    Powder Conditions: Surface area and rider weight that translates into float are the overriding factors in establishing the maximum suggested rider weight in powder. A float value of 16 (2 skiboards) square centimetres per pound is used to establish the maximum rider weights to optimize powder riding/float. That is not to say that heavier riders will not be able to ride in powder with a specific board. Just that there will be less float and it may take a little more effort to keep the tips up.

    All Mountain Riding: All mountain riders are looking for a balance of float and manoeuvrability and they are willing to sacrifice a little of each but still expect the skiboard to perform well in any condition. For all mountain riders with a powder bias, 14 (2 skiboards) square centimetres per pound of rider weight is used (in blue & yellow color) to keep the float value at an acceptable level for excursions into powder. Whereas a ratio of 12 (2 skiboards) square centimetres per pound of rider weight is used (in purple color) for all mountain riders with a bias for groomers.

    Terrain Park & Groomers: Float is not a consideration for these application/conditions; rather skiboard length is because of the desire for manoeuvrability. The skiboard’s length should generally be no more than ½ the rider’s height to retain the nimble “skiboard feel”. The rider needs to decide what is more important to them, the manoeuvrability in a shorter skiboard that meets the minimum rider height for the binding type, or the stability (front to back to land jumps or cruise the groomers) of a longer skiboard.

    HOW TO USE THE TABLE:

    1. Measure your height in inches and your weight in pounds.
    2. Determine what type of bindings (release or non-release) you prefer.
    3. Determine the type of riding you want to participate in the majority of the time you are riding (Terrain Park & Groomers, Powder, or All Mountain.
    4. If All Mountain is your riding preference, determine your bias; “powder” or “groomer”.
    5. If you will be in the Terrain Park or Groomers, locate your height on the right side of the table and move horizontally to the left to identify suggested boards for use with releasable bindings (yellow or blue) or with non-release (blue only) bindings.
    6. If you will be in Powder or All Mountain, locate your weight range on the left side of the table and move horizontally to the right to identify suggested boards for use with release bindings (yellow, blue, or purple) or with non-release bindings (blue & purple only).
    7. If you have an All Mountain “powder” preference, select skiboards in the yellow (release binding) & blue (release & non-release binding) range. If you have a “groomer” All Mountain bias, select skiboards in the purple (release & non-release binding) range.
    8. When more than one skiboard is suggested, consider the boards “personality” as dictated by its flex, width, and side cut radius. Note that: http://www.skiboardreview.com/ is a good source of other rider’s impressions of the skiboard’s personality. But be sure that the rider providing the review closely matches your weight, height, skill, and riding presences, otherwise the performance result may not be the same for you.

    If in the end you need a tie breaker between a couple of skiboard options, do this test:
    http://www.skiboardsonline.com/vbull...ead.php?t=8513

    FINE PRINT:
    Use the selection table at your own risk. The table and this post are not a replacement for good judgement on the part of the skiboard buyer, nor is there any claim that it represents all situations. That is why it is a “guideline” and starting point in your skiboard selection process.
    Last edited by Greco; 05-07-2015 at 12:47 PM.


    132 Osprey, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, 110 Condor (Green), 109 Spliff

    Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

    Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


    Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

    Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts
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  2. #2 Question about this chart 
    SBOLTeam III Rider bri_guy's Avatar
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    Okay, so I understand how to use the chart. However, are there guidelines for the opposite case, i.e. minimum rider WEIGHT and maximum HEIGHT?

    I'm 5'8, but I'm an unusually lightweight 125lbs. Would anything larger than the Rumspringa 103 be too big for me?

    SBOL Team III Rider

    Skiboards
       Revel8 2010 Revolt "Bullseye" 105cm
       Revel8 2009 Rumspringa "MaryJane" 103cm
       Revel8 2009 Tansho 90cm (BriGirl's)
    Bindings
       Spruce 2011 Pro Jr Risers & Head Release Bindings
       Spruce 2010 Pro Lite Risers & Roxy Release Bindings (BriGirl's)
    Other
       Salomon 2009 Mission x4 boots
       Sims T22 Omen helmet

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  3. #3  
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bri_guy View Post
    Okay, so I understand how to use the chart. However, are there guidelines for the opposite case, i.e. minimum rider WEIGHT and maximum HEIGHT?

    I'm 5'8, but I'm an unusually lightweight 125lbs. Would anything larger than the Rumspringa 103 be too big for me?
    Nope, the min and max are being used appropriately.

    Since the criteria for powder riding is square centimeters per pound (weight), it is maximum weight as presented.

    The heights are based on SBOL's recommended minimum rider heights for non versus release bindings, and a rule of thumb of length no more than 1/2 the rider's height if in the terrain park.

    Another way to look at it is that most riders look for a skiboard that is as short as possible but is still able to provide the manoeuvrability, float and stability they want. That is what the chart is trying to reflect, while also factoring in the binding minimum height recommendations.

    No, a longer skiboard would not be too big, but there are considerations that may not make it optimal for you. As an example, the Revolt would allow you to still go non-releasable and you would have excellent float in powder (more than is thought to be required). But you will experience more swing weight and the skiboards will be harder to control because you may not be able to flex them if you are not an aggressive rider. Anything longer (110 & +) and you would need to go releasable. So you can go longer, but there are trade offs to consider versus the benefits.

    I hope this helps clarify the criteria.


    132 Osprey, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, 110 Condor (Green), 109 Spliff

    Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

    Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


    Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

    Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts
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  4. #4  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Isaac.Jarvis's Avatar
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    Thanks for making this slow, its too bad I didn't see this before I got my revolts lol
    Revel8 Revolt "city" (lite riser release bindings)
    Revel8 Rumspringa "Mary Jane"
    "No guts No glory" my skiboarding motto
    Real Age: 20
    "I value my life more than a helmet" - nolhay
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  5. #5 My First Post Here 
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    Great forum!

    This selection table is excellent, but as a total skiboard noob, it took me a while to really understand it. Maybe the following will help others new to the sport.

    My confusion related to the area titled "Terrain Park & Groomers". The statement "Maximum rider height based on 2X skiboard length" is intended to apply only to terrain parks. There is also a minimum rider height, below which releasable bindings become mandatory.
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  6. #6  
    Skiboarder @zenboyscout's Avatar
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    Praise all things geek.
    FT Konflict
    BWP "Carbon Zombie"
    Spruce 120 "Chairlifts"
    Spruce Risers w/SL100 bindings
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  7. #7  
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    I feel so restricted on what I can get. Or at least on what this table recommends. I'm under 5 foot and 135lbs. I've always used the 99cm at the rental shops, but I've been looking at getting my own skiboards. I just can't decide if I want/need release bindings or not, but it looks like non-release doesn't give me many options.
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  8. #8  
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    Please keep in mind that the table is a guide and you need to decide what level of risk you are comfortable with.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    132 Osprey, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, 110 Condor (Green), 109 Spliff

    Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

    Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


    Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

    Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts
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  9. #9  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mary View Post
    I feel so restricted on what I can get. Or at least on what this table recommends. I'm under 5 foot and 135lbs. I've always used the 99cm at the rental shops, but I've been looking at getting my own skiboards. I just can't decide if I want/need release bindings or not, but it looks like non-release doesn't give me many options.
    The only restriction you have is that you have to go with releasable bindings over 110cm. As Slow says, everything else is just a guideline. Do a few searches on the site, there are plenty of threads comparing all the binding choices.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  10. #10  
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    Oh, well I know that this is all just a guideline. And I have been looking into a lot of stuff, especially on this site. But I'm thinking about getting non-release bindings, and I feel like if I do, I should get shorter boards. I'm considering release for safety, but I think I've only ever actually lost a ski once in all the time I've skied, so I'm not sure if the non-release would cause problems anyway.
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  11. #11  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mary View Post
    Oh, well I know that this is all just a guideline. And I have been looking into a lot of stuff, especially on this site. But I'm thinking about getting non-release bindings, and I feel like if I do, I should get shorter boards. I'm considering release for safety, but I think I've only ever actually lost a ski once in all the time I've skied, so I'm not sure if the non-release would cause problems anyway.
    It's a very personal choice based on your comfort level. I use non release bindings up to 100 cm and non release above. Having said that ,I rarely go over 88 cm anymore! I really appreciate the great feel, response and weight of non release bindings. Others see the benefits of non release and soft boot set ups.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  12. #12  
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    I guess I'm just worried that I'll buy something and then realize later that it wasn't a good idea and I should have bought something else, but I'll never really know well a specific setup works for me until I try it. Reviews can only do so much, as that person isn't me in my exact situation. But this site seems to be good at helping people with this kind of thing.
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  13. #13  
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    Mary,

    You may want to contact Greco at SBOL and talk to him about the rental program and his recommendation.


    132 Osprey, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, 110 Condor (Green), 109 Spliff

    Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

    Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


    Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

    Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts
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  14. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow View Post
    Mary,

    You may want to contact Greco at SBOL and talk to him about the rental program and his recommendation.
    I was actually reading some forums and just realized this was a thing. I'm definitely going to have to do that. Makes me want to plan another ski trip this winter to try it out!
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